Arrived Turtle Bay

We motor sailed all day Tuesday under a partially sunny skies. Winds were 5 – 12 knots from behind and it was T-shirt weather. The water temp rose to 71 degrees. The seas were not too bad and we had quite a pleasant day. Mike’s pork fried rice for dinner was wolfed down.

Gary, who is our fishing expert, declared that we would not catch any fish until the water temp got to 70 – 72 degrees. He had it nailed, as we caught three fish. The first one was the biggest, at 6 – 7 pounds. It gave quite a fight and Gary worked hard to reel him in on Snug Harbor’s most ancient rod and reel, a hand me down from an old friend. We first thought he was a bonito and filleted him up for later dining. Mike got out the fish ID book and discovered our fish was really just a large, but lowly, skipjack, which we normally throw back. However, Gary wanted a taste so Mike made him some tacos. Gary liked them and gave us all a taste. However, our long held notions that jacks are poor eating were difficult to overcome and the rest of us left it at a taste. We caught two more smaller jacks, which we threw back to swim another day.

We pulled into Turtle Bay at 2130 and had the anchor down by 2200. We covered 326 miles in 2 days and 14 hours, at an average speed of 5 1/4 knots. We motor sailed for all but 4 hours. As best we can figure we burned 30 – 35 gallons of diesel, equivalent to ~10 MPG. We all reached for our cell phones to check in with our better halfs, celebrated arrival with libations in the cockpit and then slept well into the following morning. Having all been to Turtle Bay multiple times we elected to chill aboard for the day. Activities included transferring our 25 gallons of diesel in jerry jugs into Snug Harbor’s tanks, cleaning up Snug Harbor, reading, dozing and engine checks. Tonight we will barbecue brats and watch a movie.

The anchor goes up at dawn tomorrow and Snug Harbor will head for Bahia Santa Maria, another 250 miles down the coast. We expect to arrive early Friday morning. It looks like more light winds and motorsailing.

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