Pink Diesel and Other Musings

Snug Harbor slaked her thirst last week with the infusion of 90 gallons of pink marine diesel at Gas House Cove in San Francisco. “Why pink?” you may be thinking. Marine diesel is no different than the diesel you put in your evil VW except that it includes some red dye mandated by the tax man. The color proves that it is fuel that has had marine taxes slapped on. If the Coasties catch you with clear diesel in your tanks, then you are in big trouble for cheating Jerry Brown out of his marine taxes. Of coarse if you use any of that pink marine diesel in your car, then you are also in big trouble for cheating Jerry Brown out of the road use taxes that are slapped on clear automotive diesel!

When we sail offshore it is cold and damp at night until we get about half way down the Baja coast. This increases the crew’s normal level of misery. The Captain wised up before the last trip to Mexico and had a cockpit enclosure made. It is installable/removable, with no small effort, so it only gets used when you really want to keep the weather out.

Cockpit enclosure

This turns the cockpit into a pilothouse and keeps the crew warm and dry. Standing the night watch in fleece with a steaming hot drink is a lot nicer than sitting in a wet puddle of  fog in a full suit of supposedly waterproof foulies.

Some of my newly joined followers told me they are wondering what kind of a boat Snug Harbor is. It is a 47′ long Catalina 470 sailboat. It was built in 2001 in Florida and has been heavily customized by the Captain for cruising. It weighs ~15 tons, draws 8 feet of water and the tip of the mast is 65 feet above waterline. It motors at ~ 7 knots and when under a hard press of sail will do 8-9 knots. It gets about 6 miles a gallon when motoring in calm conditions at and can go a long way on its 150 gallons of diesel.  A “knot” is equal to 1.15 statute miles per hour, or 1 nautical mile per hour. Here are a few pics:

SalonNav StationForward StateroomGalleyAnchored in the Sea of CortezIf you are really into excruciating detail (there are a few followers that are engineers) and want to know all there is to know about every bit of equipment on Snug Harbor, then here is a copy of her latest survey:  2018 March survey

The Captain was doing the last day of prep on Snug Harbor yesterday and was approached by a delightful couple, Margie and Peter Benzinger. It turns out Margie and Peter are taking a hiatus from a multi-year circumnavigation in their 47 foot sailboat to spend time with family in the Bay Area. They plan to be here about the amount of time Snug Harbor is gone and want to sublease Snug Harbor’s Alameda slip.  Yahoo!!

To offset that good news, one of the Captain’s long time crew, Bill Burk, called to cancel at the last minute, due to work conflicts. Bummer! Bill had been really looking forward to the trip and noted it was the first vacation he had scheduled since the last time he sailed with Snug Harbor down the coast — three years ago!  the Captain is reminded that he is forever grateful that his personal chain of command is limited to the Admiral, who understands his need to periodically go off and play in boats.

Snug Harbor will be heading out the gate Sunday morning and turning left for San Diego. The forecast looks like strong winds on Sunday, followed by much lighter conditions.  Our first stop will be 300+ miles down the coast in Oxnard at Channel Islands Harbor. We should get there sometime Tuesday. Stay tuned…

3 thoughts on “Pink Diesel and Other Musings

  1. Love your blogs and hope I can talk Ted into coming down while you are in La Pas. I would try to arrange it to come when Mitzi is there, so will hopefully be able to talk to her or email her fairly often. Blessings on your wonderful journey. I know you love it.
    Doreen

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